Monday, May 27, 2013

The Price They Paid


I had only planned on one post today, then the WSO told me about the PBS Memorial Day concert. She asked me if I knew Charles Durning. I indicated that I did. She told me that she had seen a film clip of him talking about his experiences on D-Day, the 6th of June 1944. So I did some research and I found the clip she was talking about.

It's a few years old, but if there has ever been any doubt in your minds as to what America's sons and daughters have endured in war, this should remove that doubt.

Charles Durning, though he would never admit to it, was a hero. One of many from the World War II generation who are fewer and fewer every day. Watch this and remember them. And all those who have given the last full measure for our freedom.

12 comments:

  1. The real heroes never feel like heroes.
    (that's one of the few times you'll see me use the word never)
    Most often we will hear the hero's story from a witness... or we may not know of it at all.

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  2. Brilliant video... except for that quick cut of Dear Nancy.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, I almost mentioned that in the post, but why spoil it?

      Charles Durning was quite a guy.

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    2. Gratuitous shot of her- but this is a PBS video. I doubt Durning would have approved had he editorial rights to this video. Great vid otherwise. Thanks for posting.

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    3. Yeah, gratuitous. I guess if PBS wants funding then there are things they have to do.

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  3. Yea Buck,

    I spotted her right off. If she was going to speak I would have tuned out, but I new it was just a quick photo op.

    Mr. Durning a quiet hero, as most real heroes are....Qiuet.

    My Uncle joined the U.S. Navy at 18 in 1942 and served on a Minesweeper in 5 invasions: North Africa, Sicily, Salorno, Anzio and finally Normandy. After the war he returned to his home, got a job with the U.S. Post office and started a family. He passed away about 10 years ago and never spoke of his service. I only heard about it from his sister (my mother) afterwards. His nick-name was "Boy" or to me "Uncle Boy". I remember him every Memorial Day for his service.

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    Replies
    1. I almost didn't post it because of her, but what Mr Durning had to say outweighed any Pelosi-contamination.

      Your Uncle sounds like Mr Durning, a quiet hero. Like you say, the real kind.

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  4. What a powerful testimony..so honest and heartfelt....thanks Mr Durning and all the others just as scared as you were, true courage.

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Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)