Saturday, August 26, 2017

The 60s

(Source)
Shaun had a nice post about the 1960s over at his place on Friday, it brought back some pretty good memories. I read the post at lunch, then went back to work thinking how great the 60s were.

Then it struck me, hard.

The 60s, great for some. Not for others.

I'm getting to be a crotchety old bastard these days, too much going on in the world, too much going on in my head. I didn't feel much like blogging Friday night, so I listened to a lot of music from back in the day. Not Shaun's fault, I really have fond memories of the 60s, but I can't help but remember what else was going on in the rest of the world during that decade.

There are times I wish I was old enough to have gone, most of the time I'm damned glad I wasn't.

I shake the hand of every Vietnam veteran I meet. Thanks isn't enough. Never will be, but to my elder brothers and sisters in arms - Thanks. I love you guys. I mourn those left lost.

Never forget...

Photo by Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden (Source)
(Source)
Retired Marine Corps Capt. Ronald E. Hoover Sr. admires the Three Servicemen Statue on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., July 8, 2010. The statue, which was unveiled in 1984, was rededicated after six weeks of restoration work. Hoover, a native of Carlisle, Pa., served two tours in Vietnam and retired from the Marine Corps in 1974.
DoD photo by Army Sgt. 1st Class Michael J. Carden  (Source)



58,307 names...

That's how I remember the 60s.



24 comments:

  1. Thanks, Sarge. I was lucky that I was in a job that kept me out of the bad stuff, just flying up and down the coast looking for infiltrating trawlers. We (my crew) caught a couple that were eventually blown out of the water. I like to think that we kept some bad stuff from happening. When I visited the Memorial in 1999 it took me some time before I was able to walk up to it. To see so many names in one place and to realize how and why they were put there was staggering.

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    1. You are most welcome Flugelman, it's an honor to have you here.

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  2. Much of the 50's sucked, the war was horrible and much of the divisiveness in the country today had its start with the protests of Viet Nam. I wonder when there will be people that want those statues torn down...I suspect it won't be long, the world is crazy!

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  3. Ouch. Just remembered sitting in a mess hall in Hanau reading the casualty list in the 'Stars and Stripes'.

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    1. Sitting in my parents' living room, looking at the faces of the week's casualties in either Life or Look magazine. That has always stayed with me.

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  4. Two tours with Navy Seabees. Sarge, you didn't miss much. Be glad you didn't go.

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  5. I started them in high school, went into the Navy, then to college (and work) in the SF Bay Area mostly observing and disagreeing with the movement.
    Finished up thinking nobody was 100% right or wrong, except for assasins.
    I still don't understand how someone can get so angry that they have to commit violence.

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  6. I started high school(freshman year) in 68. I turned 18 in time to have to play the last lottery........

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  7. That era was the first time that I wore the uniform of the United States military. I've commented before what I was doing, so no need to repeat. My hat is always off to those who served in a combat zone, especially those who were under enemy fire.

    Paul L. Quandt

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  8. After the radical left have polished off all the Confederate generals and slave owning Founders, can these tributes to "warmongers" be far behind?

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  9. I volunteered in '71, the closest I came to SEA was Okinawa. No regrets about not being sent to VN. Late 60's and early 70's were crazy times. Still have negative memories of how many times those in uniform were poorly treated in U.S. Fickle public

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    1. Fickle indeed, mostly from being misinformed.

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  10. The photo of the Three Servicemen Statue drew me back. While the Wall is the most emotional for me, it is a toss up between the Three Servicemen Statue and the Korean War Statues that I enjoy looking at the most. I was in D.C. last winter for my semi-annual visit to honor those we've lost, it was snowing and the effect of the Korean War Statues was breath-taking: that image came to my mind many times when I recently read Shaara's "The Frozen Hours".

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    1. My first visit to the Korean War Memorial was in the spring. To me it's a very moving place.

      I can't imagine what it's like in winter.

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  11. You didn't miss much OAFS, SEA wasn't all it was cracked up to be. regards, Alemaster

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  12. Nothing in the world is exclusively one thing or another.

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    Replies
    1. I know. Your post reminded me of what a great childhood I had.

      Then as I was reading something, the darkness rolled in and I was reminded of what others had to go through in the 60s.

      That happens more often as I get older.

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Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)