Saturday, March 3, 2018

No Power

No post.

Lost power last night at 1700 local. As of 0700, we're still living in the 18th Century.

Lost a couple of shingles to the wind, but the house maintained its water-tight integrity throughout the storm.

Oddly enough, the Mexican restaurant down the street and around the corner still had power. Guess where we had dinner?

I love burritos.

More later. Cell phone posting has its limits.

22 comments:

  1. Hang in there OAFS, I hope you have some heat source.

    All my best to you and yours.
    Paul L. Quandt

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fortunately it's not really cold out. Temperature in the house is still in the high 50s.

      We'll survive.

      Delete
  2. I should have panicked and stocked up on milk, bread, and eggs when NOAA forecast "no appreciable accumulation" for our area.
    The several inches of "no appreciable accumulation" meant my wife didn't get to leave school until the much delayed buses showed up and all the students left. That took around three extra hours.
    I had both Google maps, and Waze open on the home computer this gave me a great eye-in-the-sky viewpoint, and I was able to guide her homeward bound route safely around the worst of the traffic problems.
    I would insert my incredibly clever melding of air traffic control jargon with her driving home, but I don't really know any air traffic control jargon and worry doesn't contribute to being clever.
    It was a bit disconcerting when she reported, "I just drove under a downed tree, it just came out of the swirling snow" I managed to remain calm and rationally discuss with her what driving a bit fast for conditions means.
    And oddly, I really do mean rationally, because people driving under stress in bad conditions don't need to hear someone screaming, "what the hell is wrong with you, slow down!" Indeed, few situations are improved by screaming at people, a fact that many alleged managers both in an out of the military never learn.
    Screaming is reserved for times when it is entirely appropriate to say things like, "It's going to explode, run for your life!"
    People will rarely realize the extent of the danger if you look at them calmly, lower both your volume and tone and say, "It's going to explode, run for your life!"
    I remember this one time on the forecastle when the anchor was coming up and the windlass made an odd sound, the Chief Boatswains Mate yelled, "Run!" and the forecastle was deserted in the blink of an eye.

    The house lights blinked a couple of times but stayed on.

    Hope your power comes back on soon.


    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No snow here. Vicious winds yesterday.

      Still waiting for power...

      Delete
  3. Power going out makes you appreciate how much of life revolves around flicking a switch on to do...... everything! Hoping the line crews can handle things fast, they have it tough in the winter. It gets too cold, let the faucets drip Sarge. Good luck!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fortunately it's been "warm," in the mid-40s. House is "toasty," mid-50s. I'm not complaining, much.

      Delete
  4. Wrap up and keep your head down. I turned on the Weather Channel this AM and saw where I used to live got 30 inches of snow yesterday. Here in Western MI we had sunshine and 45 degrees and bare ground. Today I'm happy to be here :)
    Prayers your power comes back on soon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We had sunshine for a while Saturday. Still no power.

      Delete
  5. Here in North Central WA State we had a pretty good snow with bright sunshine & blue skies by mid day yesterday.
    Heard about the Nor'easter in your neck of the woods.
    Amazing how dark a house can be when the power goes out, huh? We get it here too.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I remember an occasion some time back when we lost power in Anderson.
    Everyone else, except for four houses on our block had it back in a couple of hours.
    We waited three days for the power to come back on because other areas where mor folks had the power out had priority.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm patiently waiting. I know the National Grid crews are working hard. You see them all over, restoring lines, replacing downed poles, they're earning their pay this weekend!

      Delete
  7. A big storm, no power, no lights, shingles torn from the roof but you can still post to the internet with your phone. Do we live in a great time or what?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And we still have running water! Answering comments on a cell phine by candlelight. Weird!

      Delete
  8. Well, late to the game, as usual. Hope you’re back in the latter half of the 20th Century by now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Still in the latter half of the 19th.

      Delete
  9. stay warm and dry :)
    we had some serious chill, -15 celsius at night, but it was on mild end of scale compared to well under -25 elsewhere in my country

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So far all is manageable. Sounds cold over there!

      Delete
  10. Checking back in to see if you are back in the 21st century yet or not? At least you still had running water. Do you guys have a fireplace or a wood stove? Candles only heat so much. Maybe you guys are putting a generator on your Easter wish list? Honda makes an awesome one, they run about $1000-1200. Worth every penny to keep the freezers frozen and not the water pipes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We have returned to the late 20th century. We have power but no internet. Well, other than via the cell phone. Right now the computer is a paperweight.

      Delete
    2. tried using cell phone as modem via bluetooth or wifi?
      im on wireless net access since moved out of the block and into small house on outskirts of city

      Delete
  11. FEMA has made noises they should be in charge of power restoration post disaster. In that case New Orleans would still be awaiting electricity post Katrina today in 2018.

    ReplyDelete

Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)