Friday, July 26, 2019

'Tis Done

What replaced the original equipment in the old Mk 1 Mod 0 Eyeball, Left.
(Source)
Cool. I now have a spiral galaxy embedded in my left eye.

Rather science fiction-like innit?

The mote in Sarge's eye?

Barred spiral galaxy NGC 1300 photographed by Hubble telescope.
While it wasn't painful per se, it was, like the last eye surgery I had, weird. In spades. Kinda like watching an old 1950s science fiction film with bizarre special effects. The biggest impression I had was glowing balls rising upon columns of smoke. Inside my eye.

Weird.

Healing is occurring, vision, while still blurry, is now clear, no longer feels like I'm looking through a pad of gauze. Hard to explain, post op appointment is later today, More news to follow.

For those of you facing this surgery: don't sweat it, it ain't that bad.

Trust me.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have a new galaxy to explore.

(Original)
Man, what did they put in those eye drops?




50 comments:

  1. Ah, a reconstituted eyeball Mark 2 along with a refitted finger Mark 1.5....... what kind of warranty were you given on these? Taking some time off or are you back into the slog come Monday? Remember more than one kind of beer.....er....ale.....er... libation.... yes.. yes. helps the healing process. More heat & humidity today.

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    1. Back into the slog come Monday. No rest for the weary.

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  2. Wow. That is some kind of wizardry. Congrats on the new eye.

    I had an eye procedure this year, and it was strange. Green laser, "hold your head in this device, here are handles to hold", no movement.... My feet were trying to run away, but my mind was focused on holding my head still and trying to stare at the spot I was told to look at. NOT PLEASANT.

    We are in the wide wide world of medical wonders....

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    1. Heh, "don't move your head." Heard that on Thursday, they actually taped my head to the stretcher.

      Our ancestors would be amazed at what the docs can do these days.

      Delete
  3. I recall that David Weber's Honor Harrington character had an advanced prosthetic eye in addition to her prosthetic arm.
    I'm thinking that an electronic eyeball running on a Windows operating system would be interesting. And by "interesting" I mean, "Who thought that would be a good idea!"
    The range finding, night vision, and FLIR features of the APED (Advance Prosthetic Eyeball Device) would be totally awesome.
    Make sure the limit switches that prevent firing the APED's death ray through your closed eyelids are working.
    In theory, incorporating a hologram projector in the APED would allow you to project a film, and watch it with your other eye.

    The rational part of my mind, (tiny but still active) accepts and believes what you say about the surgery.
    Unfortunately another part of mind insists on using the voice of a badly frightened little girl to shriek, "They're going to do what to my eye? Run away, run away!!!," every time I consider that I might be having the surgery somewhere down the road.

    Keep healing and take care.















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    1. I struggled at times to keep my inner frightened child at bay during the surgery. Mostly succeeded. 😉

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    2. I can see it now, in the middle of combat, you've drawn a bead on YourDeadliestDastardlyEnemy and then WindowstotheEye 3.5 starts updating, even though you've set the update schedule for 5 am next Thursday.

      Yeah...

      Could be worse, could be Googlegoggle Chrome. At which time you'd be able to see everything, but only see what Googlegoggle wants you to see first before you actually see what you want to see.

      AmazonlookingatYou would promise great savings and rapid delivery and free updating, but your eye would crap out and the new one which should have been here already is in some 3rd party delivery vehicle full of stoners, or worse, been swiped from your doorstep. Not to mention AlaY would be storing and analyzing everything you see with your AlaY-eye and steering people that they think you want to see towards you, plus hucksters selling little blue pills and other things.

      EyesontheFace(book) would track everything you do, and black out things or people that they think are conservative or a threat to EotF(b) megacorp. At the same time they'd allow jihadists, antifists and other anarchists unprecedented access to new equipment without any monitoring at all.

      Yeah.... Um.... I'll just take a good old vat-grown eye. I mean, what could go wrong with that, right?

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    3. Hahaha!

      Now that is a classic!

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    4. Beans. As far as using a vat grown eye, how about some genetic tinkering to mix in animal genes. Cats, raptors, and undersea creatures spring to mind.
      Then we can avoid the whole updating software thing.
      What could possibly go wrong?

      Delete
    5. Suddenly I have a need to be out at night, seeking prey.

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    6. Well, unfortunately you don't have to worry about Roy Baty breaking into your eye-gene maker and squashing your eye that's in production.

      God Speed, Rutger Hauer, may you actually see the arms of Orion now.

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    7. Roger that. Good man that Rutger Hauer.

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    8. I was going to write much the same thing ( "They're going to do what to my eye? Run away, run away!!!," every time I consider that I might be having the surgery somewhere down the road." ) as John in Philly wrote, but, of course, I was a day late and a dollar short. Happy to read that healing goes well.

      Thanks for the post.
      Paul L. Quandt

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    9. It seems to be healing up nicely.

      Delete
  4. Kendy had that surgery for both eyes a couple years ago and she would agree with you,
    the surgery was no big deal. But she did say that the eye drops she had to use afterwards
    (I think for 30 days) burned like fire. She now has 20/20 vision.

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    Replies
    1. Some of those eye drops seem to be made of burning napalm, maybe Willie Pete.

      Delete
  5. Glad it's over and you are already seeing clearer. That is my future as of August 12. Right eye; aggressive cataract on the back of the lens. After 45 years of wearing glasses it's going to be more than strange to wear a contact lens in my left eye - and to have to wear reading glasses only. I'm anxious, but looking forward to it as well. Godspeed in healing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You'll get through it.

      Think happy thoughts. 😁

      Delete
  6. Hey AFSarge;

    I had eye surgery, but it was a Lazik procedure, basically gave me a monocle. Did one eye and left the other one alone so I would have both near and far vision. I was told by the Dr that the brain after a couple months would automatically make adjustments so I wouldn't have any double vision and other weirdness. It has been 10 years since it has been done and it is so worth it. I can't "Do" contacts, Lord knows that I tried. Although going in for the procedure was very disquieting because you rely on the eyeball for EVERYTHING.

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    1. One takes the seeing thing for granted, until it's impaired!

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  7. Toldja :-). WRT to the Mote: On the gripping hand......

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Why yes, you did.

      I see we've read some of the same books. 😎

      Delete
  8. Hopefully you doctor checked to see if there were any experimental IOL protocols you could enroll in so I can keep my day job. :D

    It’s good to see this stuff helping people in the real world (I *hope* it helps, heh).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They're always pushing the boundaries, I think your job is secure. 😊

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  9. They put magical rapid healing potions in the eye drops...that is why it is so very important to do them for the entire time you are supposed to...cause...eyeball!!! Necessary for continued blogging and writing of wonderful stories involving tanks and fighting and stuff, not to mention drum playing...

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    Replies
    1. They are magical, don't most magical potions sting?

      Thanks Suz.

      Delete
  10. Glad things went well! The Missus sent me this picture of you. Makes me want to rush out and "git 'er done!"

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    1. I don't think Sarge wants to be assimilated by his fellow Rhode Islanders. He has way too much of a conservative streak in him. Although the accessories are cool!

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    2. juvat - Wow, they told me that pic would remain private. Oh well, resistance was futile.

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    3. Tuna - I'm assimilating them!

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    4. Oh, God. They've turned you into a pompous Englishman who thinks he's a pompous Frenchman. The Bastiges!!!

      Delete
  11. The most difficult part of cataract procedure for me is the waiting.
    There is way too much waiting in every step of the process.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Waiting sucks. Not to put too fine a point on it.

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  12. Still fighting with megagovinsuranceco to get wife's eyes peeled and zapped. Supposedly it is a no-cost-to-us procedure but the provider for no-cost-to-us procedures is a little farther away than Mumbai.

    Glad you're on the mend. And you need to keep your wife from sending pictures to juvat. Next thing you'll know, she'll start describing how she vacuumed while using her hands to show the sweeping pattern, "There I was, on a cloudless morning, stooping out of the sun to vacuum a track of cat hair. The hair never saw me coming. Strack!" (with applicable sweepy swoopy hand gestures...)

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  13. Sarge, how heavy is that thing that they put two carry handles on it?

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  14. Worst part of my procedure was the nurse trying to get an IV started. I had pointed out the best location on my right elbow (known to me because of years of donating blood and platelets) but she completely ignored me and went first to the left elbow, then the back of the left hand, then to the back of the right hand, then I told her to get the firetruck away from me and get a real nurse, NOW! Why yes, I was a mite perturbed by then. Older nurse comes in and hits it first try, you guessed it, in the right elbow.

    Strangely, I don't remember the drops burning.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Yeah, finding the right spot for an IV can get, shall we say, a bit annoying. I don't let them probe anymore, it's just "Back of the right hand, just do it, I know it burns but it's better than 87 sticks in arm without finding a vein."

      Less fuss that way.

      The drops only burned the first day, fine now.

      Delete
    2. I have, in both my arms, huge veins the size of sewer pipes (as one phlebotomist described them) but they are shy veins, prone to skittering away from the needle if the needle-sticker-person goes in too slowly. I tell them, every time, to make it a quick, sharp stick but noooooooo, what do I know, I mean, it's only the same body I've been in since 1963 (thanks, med science, for NOT following up on rapid body cloning and genetic enhancement.)

      Delete
    3. "The size of sewer pipes..."

      Interesting mental image there, Beansy. Quick and sharp is the best kind, gets it over with.

      Delete
    4. Well, as to sewer pipe veins, about the 10th time you hear that your veins are the biggest they've seen in a long time, and one doc actually calls them 'sewer pipe veins,' well, you have to acknowledge your veins are unusual.

      I've heard a lot of med people describe me and my body parts and my reaction to medicine as 'unusual.' Which is probably good, because I don't think the world can handle more than one of me.

      Delete
    5. Do you know a guy named Xavier?

      Delete
  15. It is awesome times that we are living, I keep reminding myself whenever I see new wonders of medicine...
    Remember whn Luke "Coolhand" Skywalker was showing us something we deemed Galaxy far-far away?
    Nowadays veterans of our wars get to have such hands.
    https://youtu.be/rNyZeR29j_c

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    1. That's an awesome breakthrough right there.

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  16. congrats on your new implant, Sarge - it is amazing the amount of body parts that can be replaced or improved these days with parts from sources other that the recipient's body. And no, I am not referring just to one of the more common usages of 'implants'! :-)
    Best of luck on a speedy regaining of good vision.

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    1. Thanks Tom. Modern medical science is pretty amazing.

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