Tuesday, February 16, 2016

Sternutation

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First picture is what I am afflicted with at the moment. Have had it since at least Saturday, probably has been present longer. I only became symptomatic on Saturday. It's been noted that the common rhinovirus under a microscope kinda looks like one of these -
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(Compare and contrast for extra credit...)

When it really hits you though, it feels like you've been trampled by one of these -

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Needless to say, I ain't feeling, shall we say, "up to snuff" at the moment.

Look on the bright side, Your Humble Scribe (and you, Dear Readers) got to learn a new word today -

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Now if you will excuse me, I must go search for my derrière. It seems I may have "sternutated" that bad boy right off.

Now if you simply must have more content than mine own feeble offerings on this day, go read this, which was linked by Blogger-in-Arms XBradTC, and to which I offer his link. Captain Sobel deserves to be better remembered than he is currently.

Yes, you'll have to chase another link for the Paul Harvey* on that but I wanted to give XBradTC props for pointing me to that link. What with him nursing a new location as WordPress apparently banned/suspended he and his merry band of ne'er-do-wells for some imagined transgression, I felt the need to steer traffic (paltry though it be) in his direction.

It's what we do here in the blogoverse, we share, we link, we desperately try to come up with content on a daily basis and yes, sometimes we whine about it.

Well, I do. Not proud of the fact but there it is.

Now if you'll excuse me (again) I must replace the splash guard on my keyboard.




*Paul Harvey of course, being famous for his radio programs in which he provided us with "the rest of the story." For those of us old enough to remember him.


26 comments:

  1. That is a good article on Captain Soble.

    Stay close to the porcelain.

    ReplyDelete
  2. So how far do you think a sternutating white rhino can shoot snot?

    Get better soon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. According to my experiments...

      Well, let's not go there, not a pretty sight.

      Working on the getting better...

      Delete
  3. Try as I may, I am unable to use sternutation in a sentence.

    And blogger doesn't recognize it as a word...I set blogger straight and added it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are many words Blogger doesn't know. My guess is that Blogger dropped out of school after the sixth grade.

      Sternutation is not an easy word to use in a sentence. Though it seems to work well as a post title.

      Delete
    2. The patient has experienced prolonged sternutation and as a result has developed bleeding from the nose.

      Delete
    3. Ladies and gentlemen, we have a winner!

      Thanks Ryszardsh!

      Delete
    4. Now if we could get him to perform a Pronunciation Respelling of his handle, then I'd give him the winner flag!

      Delete
    5. Ah ha! I knew it was Polish!

      "Ri-shart" would be Google Translate's rendition. (Roll that "R"!)

      Dziękuję Ryszard!

      Delete
  4. At the San Diego zoo there used to be a Rhino enclosure with a warning sign about the danger zone behind rhinos. Stay safe! and we trust you'll be back to normal soonish.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The lion enclosure at that very same zoo had a warning sign concerning the aft end of the big cat. The males mark their territory by (ahem) "spraying." I made sure to stay away from the south end of a north bound lion.

      Hippos do some very disgusting things back there, I'm guessing rhinos have a similar propensity. The things one learns on the Internet never cease to fascinate, amaze, and entertain me. Then again, I'm fairly easily entertained.

      Delete
  5. When I was at the Woodward Park Zoo (Seattle), the Rhino kept his back to the visitors.
    Now I know why.

    I notice graph shows a slight increase in the use of the word.
    All I know is my grandfather had about the loudest sternutation I've ever heard.

    Note to Joe: it may have fixed it for you but I didn't work for me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adding a word to your "dictionary" only works locally.

      Another good use of the word "sternutation" in a sentence.

      Delete
  6. I read the piece on Herbert Solbol. An interesting bit of history . . . enlightening. Seems to me that Captain Solbol was the definitive embodiment of the "Citizen Soldier." Facing war, he was as hard as circumstances warranted. He had to be in order to train and survive, and then, he reverted back to being a normal civilian, living a quiet life, earning a living, raising a family.
    That's what I take away from the written piece. I now find him to be someone to emulate.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In some ways Sobol's story reminds me of Maine's Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain . . . soldier and scholar.

      Delete
    2. Interesting viewpoint Snuffy. I think you're on to something there.

      Delete
    3. Not sure if I would go so far as to compare Sobel with Chamberlain. That's neither a good thing or a bad thing. Sobel was superb at preparing men for war, he just wasn't that good at war fighting. Chamberlain on the other hand was an excellent leader and a superb war fighter.

      Delete
    4. As I commented over there "Not everyone who smiles at you is your friend, nor everyone who yells at you your enemy." Sobel seems to have been human, very good at somethings and not very good at others. Additionally, I'm pretty sure he knew his limitations, but didn't want to be labeled a coward by bringing them to light. Fortunately, for the men in his company, his commander did the right thing.

      Delete
    5. I can only imagine how that must have felt, preparing these men for battle, only to be left behind.

      Like I mentioned above, Captain Sobel deserves to be remembered, he served, with honor and some skill. Many did not.

      Delete
  7. I have been living through The Winter of Colds. At the moment, it would appear that I have bronchitis. I am holed up in my burrow, in bed, under an electric blanket, sneezing, coughing, and working on a pint of raspberry sherbet. It has no medicinal properties that I am aware of, but it makes my throat feel better.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. While the pint of sherbet may have no medicinal value per se, Napoléon once said that "the moral is to the physical as three is to one." That is, the benefit to your morale from eating that sherbet may actually help you get better.

      That's my story and I'm sticking to it. (Get better soonest Scott!)

      Delete

Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)