Sunday, January 19, 2020

She Was a Good Dog...

The Senior Granddaughter and Senior Granddog Regal
We has a sad.

On the morning of the 18th of January, Senior Granddog Regal (Big Time's first dog) entered the clearing at the end of the path.

She was a great dog, we all called her "Regal Beagle," she seemed to like that though she wasn't a beagle. She visited Chez Sarge for a few days one October, before Big Time and The WSO were married. (The WSO wanted us to meet Big Time.) Regal liked to hang out in the backyard while visiting. I'd come home from work and sit with her on the back steps of the deck. Good times.

She went to live with Big Time's folks in Michigan when he deployed. After a while Big Time and The WSO thought it would be better for Regal if she stayed in Michigan, she liked it there. A yard to play in and Big Time's mom loved to spoil her.

She would have been 17 years old next month, which is pretty old for a dog. But she had a long and happy life.

Still and all, I will miss her.

She was a good dog...
Just this side of heaven is a place called Rainbow Bridge.
When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together. There is plenty of food, water and sunshine, and our friends are warm and comfortable.
All the animals who had been ill and old are restored to health and vigor. Those who were hurt or maimed are made whole and strong again, just as we remember them in our dreams of days and times gone by. The animals are happy and content, except for one small thing; they each miss someone very special to them, who had to be left behind.
They all run and play together, but the day comes when one suddenly stops and looks into the distance. His bright eyes are intent. His eager body quivers. Suddenly he begins to run from the group, flying over the green grass, his legs carrying him faster and faster.
You have been spotted, and when you and your special friend finally meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to be parted again. The happy kisses rain upon your face; your hands again caress the beloved head, and you look once more into the trusting eyes of your pet, so long gone from your life but never absent from your heart.
Then you cross Rainbow Bridge together....
Author unknown (Source)
See you on the other side Regal...

Good dog.



44 comments:

  1. Very well written.
    Dogs give so much and ask so little in return.
    There is some nose blowing going on in Philly.
    I'm sorry for the loss.


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  2. Condolences on your family's loss. The gifts to us by pets are varied and many, and we can do well to learn from the little critters.. May she rest well and in peace.

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  3. Read a saying regarding pups....."I wish I was half the man my dog thinks I am".... condolences on the passing of Regal Beagle Sarge. Our pets are gone too soon......(sigh)

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  4. Requiescat in pace.....I understand the loss as I have experinced it one time too many, too many times. May the pain be overshadowed by the good memories.

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  5. Some animals, even if they’re in our lives for a brief period, have an influence, are remembered, and that time is cherished.

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  6. Thoughts and prayers for your family Sarge, and an extra hug for Big Times Mom. It is so hard to lose a critter, especially such a cute one!!

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  7. Neighbor down the hall recently lost her Chihuahua, "Missy", aged 14 years. Now she spoils my dog whenever she gets a chance.
    Pets give us so much and ask for so little.

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  8. I adore the big dogs. This is indeed sad. It seems the big dogs have shorter lives than the little dogs do...
    ...still, 17 years is long for a big dog like Regal. I have always had Labbies, and the longest lived one was
    12 years.
    Doggies & Kitties...folks's BAF's.

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    1. Regal looked big but she was Corgi-sized. She had a big heart though.

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  9. Lord Byron's epitaph to his Newfoundland, Boatswain is fitting:

    Near this spot lies one who possessed beauty without vanity, strength without insolence, courage without ferocity, and all of Man's virtues with none of his vices.

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  10. It is tough to loose a family member and our critters are a part of our family. You have the memories of him and they will always be with you and yours. Every time I read the Rainbow Bridge I get stuff in the eyes, I hope to have a few of my friends and family members waiting for me when I finally walk across the Rainbow Bridge to be with them. :-)

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  11. That should been her not him. sorry.

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    1. Not a problem Sir, Regal wouldn't have minded at all.

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  12. . Will Rogers Quote: “If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die I want to go where they went.” I agree with him. George Graham Vest (1830-1904) served as U.S. Senator from Missouri from 1879 to 1903 and became one of the leading orators and debaters of his time. This delightful speech is from an earlier period in his life when he practiced law in a small Missouri town. It was given in court while representing a man who sued another for the killing of his dog. During the trial, Vest ignored the testimony, and when his turn came to present a summation to the jury, he made the following speech and won the case.



    Gentlemen of the Jury: The best friend a man has in the world may turn against him and become his enemy. His son or daughter that he has reared with loving care may prove ungrateful. Those who are nearest and dearest to us, those whom we trust with our happiness and our good name may become traitors to their faith. The money that a man has, he may lose. It flies away from him, perhaps when he needs it most. A man's reputation may be sacrificed in a moment of ill-considered action. The people who are prone to fall on their knees to do us honor when success is with us, may be the first to throw the stone of malice when failure settles its cloud upon our heads.

    The one absolutely unselfish friend that man can have in this selfish world, the one that never deserts him, the one that never proves ungrateful or treacherous is his dog. A man's dog stands by him in prosperity and in poverty, in health and in sickness. He will sleep on the cold ground, where the wintry winds blow and the snow drives fiercely, if only he may be near his master's side. He will kiss the hand that has no food to offer. He will lick the wounds and sores that come in encounters with the roughness of the world. He guards the sleep of his pauper master as if he were a prince. When all other friends desert, he remains. When riches take wings, and reputation falls to pieces, he is as constant in his love as the sun in its journey through the heavens.

    If fortune drives the master forth, an outcast in the world, friendless and homeless, the faithful dog asks no higher privilege than that of accompanying him, to guard him against danger, to fight against his enemies. And when the last scene of all comes, and death takes his master in its embrace and his body is laid away in the cold ground, no matter if all other friends pursue their way, there by the graveside will the noble dog be found, his head between his paws, his eyes sad, but open in alert watchfulness, faithful and true even in death.

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  13. Deepest condolences to all. Loss of a family member is tough, of any species. Rejoice in the memories of the good times.
    John Blackshoe

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  14. Dangit. It is still utterly amazing how mere animals can keep us from oblivion, calm us down, mend us, teach us, even in their passing.

    Sorry for your family's loss.

    Dangit.

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    1. They are steadfast friends, in all times, in all circumstances.

      Thank you Andrew.

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  15. Wow....so sorry to hear.

    Just got real dusty in here....

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  16. They sure do get into your heart, don't they? Thinking of you all.

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    1. Rhey move into your heart and stay forever.

      Thank you Shaun.

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  17. My mutt is now 15 ( way past the due date for a dachshund), but she still staggers up from her bed to greet me when I come home. Devotion.

    Rudyard said it best:

    The Power of the Dog

    Rudyard Kipling

    There is sorrow enough in the natural way
    From men and women to fill our day;
    And when we are certain of sorrow in store,
    Why do we always arrange for more?
    Brothers and Sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.

    Buy a pup and your money will buy
    Love unflinching that cannot lie—
    Perfect passion and worship fed
    By a kick in the ribs or a pat on the head.
    Nevertheless it is hardly fair
    To risk your heart for a dog to tear.

    When the fourteen years which Nature permits
    Are closing in asthma, or tumour, or fits,
    And the vet’s unspoken prescription runs
    To lethal chambers or loaded guns,
    Then you will find—it’s your own affair—
    But . . . you’ve given your heart to a dog to tear.

    When the body that lived at your single will,
    With its whimper of welcome, is stilled (how still!).
    When the spirit that answered your every mood
    Is gone—wherever it goes—for good,
    You will discover how much you care,
    And will give your heart to a dog to tear.

    We’ve sorrow enough in the natural way,
    When it comes to burying Christian clay.
    Our loves are not given, but only lent,
    At compound interest of cent per cent.
    Though it is not always the case, I believe,
    That the longer we’ve kept ’em, the more do we grieve.
    For, when debts are payable, right or wrong,
    A short-time loan is as bad as a long—
    So why in—Heaven (before we are there)
    Should we give our hearts to a dog to tear?

    Like the man said if there are no dogs in the afterlife, send me where they go.

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  18. Sorry for the loss of one of your family, Sarge. Pets are definitely part of the family and their passing leaves a hole that can't be filled.

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    1. Thank you juvat. As I said, she was a good dog.

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  19. the image of you and regal hanging out in the backyard, is a good one. Although for some reason I pictured that as you having a cigar and some brown liquid, talking to the dog!

    Getting to live out your days with Grandma? Not only a good dog, a lucky dog!

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    1. That image will stay with me forever. There may have been some brown liquid involved, and Regal and I did talk. She was a good listener.

      She was lucky!

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  20. My condolences on Regal's passing. Maybe she can play with my childhood dog, Susie, while both wait for family to join them,

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    1. What a sweet thought. Thank you Comrade Misfit.

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  21. I salute our canines, fellow pilgrims they truly are. The older I get, the more I prefer their company (with notable exceptions 😉).

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  22. gaze upon her as she sashays away swishing her tail and we love them.

    I wrote serious prose. you missed it.

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    1. Roger that.

      (What did I miss? I'm at your place a lot, most of what you write is pretty serious, much of it leaves me in contemplation, I often feel unworthy of commenting. Unless it's six o'clock...)

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Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)