Monday, February 3, 2014

Snow

The view from my computer room.
There's something about the white stuff I enjoy.

You'd think the older I got, I'd start looking to maybe head south. Here's the way an old sergeant of mine put it.

"When I retire, I'm going to load up the car with everything I own, strap a snow shovel to the front grill and start driving south.
As soon as I hit a place where someone points at the shovel and asks - 'What's that?' - that's where I'm going to settle down."
That's just not me. I need the four seasons.

As long as I don't have to go out in it, I'm fine.

And it makes everything look so clean.

For a day or two.


22 comments:

  1. It's not the snow I mind, it's the ice. That's what screwed everything up last week. Temperatures weren't all that cold and the ice never really froze too solid, so it was wet. That combination makes it nearly impossible to drive on, whether in Rhode Island or Texas. And there's something to be said for cold, you can always put on more clothes, with Hot, you've got to stop sometime.

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    1. I've seen WWII footage of a Sherman tank sliding down an icy road. Ice is not your friend. (Unless it's combined with the beverage of your choice!)

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  2. I love the four seasons also, especially the snow, but then it is easy for me to just hunker down when the roads are bad.

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    1. Being retired means not having to go out in the snow. I'm looking forward to that!

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  3. Thanks for the pics.
    That's close enough for me.
    BTW - I have a snow shovel.
    It works really great for picking up leaves (and the damn acorns).

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    1. A snow shovel to pick up leaves? What a novel idea.

      As to the acorns, no thanks. I damn near broke an ankle once because of those little buggers!

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  4. When I see snow, I see next summer's irrigation water.

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    1. In Colorado you would see it that way. (I was stationed twice in Denver and went to college in Fort Collins. So I know what you mean.)

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  5. Close enough for me, right here... :-)

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    1. I live in the Northeast and post snow pictures so others can experience winter vicariously.

      Heh.

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  6. I love snow, too. On teevee, in the pages of NatGeo, and on yer blog. That said, we get just enough of that white... ummm... stuff to remind me exactly why it is I don't live Up Nawth any longer.

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    1. What I told Old NFO above applies here as well.

      Double heh.

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  7. Snow, what's that? It's snowed here maybe twice in the last ten years. I gotta head to the mountains if I want any white stuff.

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    1. California right?

      My wife was amazed when going from the daughter's place in Hanford (where it was a balmy 85) up to the mountains (not that far away) where there was snow on the ground.

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  8. It's all fun and games until this happens: http://bitsandpieces.us/2014/01/31/damn-cold/

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  9. I love watching the snow fall, swirl, blow around, etc etc etc. I'm not quite as happy about shoveling it as I used to be, though, but it's part of life up here.
    The snow thrower is my new best friend. :)

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    1. For me the neighbor's snow thrower is my best friend. He does our driveway. The walk and the deck are mine. But heck, that only takes about 15 minutes. (Last year's blizzard it took 30 minutes, 'twas a lot more snow than normal!)

      Had a friend who spent an assignment in Alaska. She often spoke of the beauty of the place. Funny though, she didn't talk much about winter up there.

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  10. I'm with you Sarge, I need the 4 seasons as well. We New Englanders are a die-hard breed when it comes to that. For my health I've been told I need to live in the southwest (asthma plus New England spring & summer don't mesh well); while I do enjoy the thought of not getting epically sick because of allergies or humidity - the thought of leaving my beloved New England fills me with fear.

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    1. I spent 24 years away from New England. While most of the places I lived were very nice, not one of them was New England. I think only a New Englander would understand that.

      I share your fear vis a vis leaving New England. I'm not sure I could do that (again!)

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    2. The both of you need to seek psychological counseling, stat.

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    3. Wouldn't work, we are, after all, New Englanders. Ain't no cure for that!

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Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)