Thursday, July 18, 2019

Busy Day

Prise du palais des Tuileries le 10 août 1792, durant la Révolution française
Jean Duplessis-Bertaux
Busy day at the salt mine, had no time at lunch to write, decided to slack off upon arrival at the manse. Nose was to the grindstone die ganzer Tag. DIL and the kids have returned to sunny California, house is like empty. Also quiet, too quiet. Feline staff likes it.

At any rate, I'm too tired to provide quality, I'm too lazy to give you a rerun...

So you get homework.

Ten myths surrounding the French Revolution. Here.

Read it and let me know your thoughts. I have a French Revolution related post in the works. It's still in my head, I think I can get it out this weekend. It's related to the link I gave you yesterday.

Blogging is hard, talk quietly among yourselves. I shall return.

Oh yes, this happened as well. Juvat had the watch, he did a screen capture for posterity.

Thanks to all who stop by to read these humble scribblings.




38 comments:

  1. Well, rest up, and scritch the cats. We will be here, when you return.

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  2. Very interesting article about the myths of the French Revolution. It certainly turned what I thought I knew on it's head. Thanks.........

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  3. Interesting link there Sarge. Became curious about a similar search on the InterNets about the Russian revolution and the first two results posted came from..... ta daaa.....leftvoice.org and bolshevik.info.......quite interesting reading from Communists about the "myths, lies, distortions, and fabrications" about that Revolution. Oh.... congrats on two meeeelllion (cue Dr. Evil voice) views from this Northlander.

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    1. Well yes, the Commies would be all over that subject wouldn't they? Did anyone bother to mention the Mensheviks? They were Commie Lite compared to the Bolsheviks.

      And thanks, couldn't happen without you readers.

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  4. There wouldn't be so many visitors if it wasn't interesting. It's the high point of my morning.

    I've never spent much time on the French revolution. I knew some of the names, but I never delved into it. I'm not sure why... I'm no Frencho-phile.... I'm a Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum type guy.

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    1. Nice way of saying "No pressure." 😉

      As the original family name was Gaudry, the French stuff interests me. But yes, I am more of a "Liberty, In God We Trust, E Pluribus Unum" kind of guy than a "liberté, égalité, fraternité" kind of guy.

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  5. Homework assignment accepted and I now know more than I did before about the French Revolution. I also wonder again how much else of what we all know to be a fact, simply isn't a fact.

    Alex, I will take "Movies That Are Set In The Time Of The French Revolution," and the answer is, "What is the 1982 movie, 'The Scarlet Pimpernel.' " (my fingers are crossed on getting the quotes within quotes correct, and someday I have to actually learn to use italics)
    I recommend watching this. The cast includes Anthony Edwards, Jane Seymour, and Gandalf, I mean Ian McKellen. Of course it isn't historically factual, but it is a bunch of fun to watch.
    The ebook by Baroness Emmuska Orczy is available for free on Amazon and on Project Gutenberg.

    Good milestone, and good post.

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  6. And here I thought the regular commentariat were the Elite of the discerning Elite - seems to be the Elite of the 2MM. Oh well, back to being deflated ... wait, that's not what I mean! Y'all have your minds in the gutter! Anyway, congrats on the milestone - onward to 3MM!

    Thanks for the link - the details of the French (as well as the Russian, as Nylon12 mentions) are weak points in my historical knowledge. Interesting stuff.

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    1. What led to those revolutions and what came afterward go far in explaining the French and Russian people.

      Yes, onward to 3 mil!

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  7. That article sounds distressingly familiar, substitute a few names here and there and Voila' tonight's headlines.

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    1. Indeed. Thought this group would find it interesting.

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  8. Gee, stage a revolution to cancel your student loans, I mean your rich entitled debts... Hmmm...

    Amazing how things get sanitized and changed to support the current narrative, isn't it? History is truly written by the winners or the revolutionarists.

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    1. You'd think with the internet and cell phones, the truth would be harder to hide, but the masses get fed the lies anyway and accept it.

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    2. Oh yeah- congrats on the 2 mill. Juvat- thanks for paying attention.

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    3. Tuna the 1st - It is simply hard to believe, innit?

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    4. Tuna the 2nd - Hey, you're part of it, some of those hits you brought in.

      I saw it coming, but it came quicker than I expected.

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  9. A primary source based addendum for any of those interested in reading further:
    https://www.theamericanconservative.com/dreher/evil-french-revolution/

    Word of warning, however—it's not a pleasant read.

    What is remarkable about the French Revolution is how quickly it turned the self-proclaimed enlightened (and scores of otherwise well-educated, high-minded people) into barbarous, mass murdering tyrants. Funny how quickly these revolutions transform from pursuing their professed ideals into convenient and thinly-veiled excuses to kill your neighbors.

    Funny too how they tend to eat their own. Many of the most influential revolutionaries (Robespierre, Marat, Danton, the duc d’Orléans, et al.)—men who helped bring the French Revolution into the world—were ultimately killed by it.

    These are lessons we would do well to heed in our own country today.

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    1. One thing I have always thought when considering the French Revolution was that the sans-culottes, i.e. the Paris mob, played a large role in the violence of the revolution. They were, in my mind, the antifa of their day. Unreasoning hatred against anything resembling the status quo.

      From my study of history I have learned that people in large groups are one second away from becoming a ravening mob of brutal barbarians. Or fleeing like base cowards.

      Group dynamics in our species are very scary.

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    2. The sans-culottes were beastly, no doubt. They definitely drove a lot of the violence and terror in Paris. Given that they were, as you put it, the Antifa of their day (although, perhaps, better dressed), their vile conduct comes as little surprise to me. As you rightly note, group dynamics in our species are indeed very scary.

      What I find remarkable is how brutally the Revolution played itself out outside Paris, in the provinces, where there was no Parisian street mob as the dominant radical political force to drive the madness. The French countryside saw mass executions by cannonade; mass drownings in the rivers; and other forms of mass butchery you wouldn't think to find outside a haunted house at Halloween. Not to mention the regional-religious genocide that was the Vendée. The sheer ghastliness of it is revolting.

      It gives me considerable pause when I stop to think about how little it might actually take to incite a mob into such debauchery. Modernists kid themselves when they think we have "evolved" on from such behaviour. As the revolutions since the French Revolution have sadly shown us, this is no mere Eighteenth Century phenomenon; it is a tragic part of the human condition.

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    3. Yes indeed, just look at what happened in Cambodia.

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    4. "Funny how quickly these revolutions transform from pursuing their professed ideals into convenient and thinly-veiled excuses to kill your neighbors." Well, if I were running things, I'd just skip the professed ideals and go straight to the killing bit. But then, there are a large number of people who I think need killing. I'm really not a nice person.

      Thanks for the post.
      Paul L. Quandt

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  10. Guess my other thoughts revolve around how thankful I am for our recognized rights under the 2nd Amendment. While I have no desire to go hunting my fellow citizens, if some of these far left maniacs, like the dude who committed suicide by ICE a few days ago, decides to start something violent, then thanks to Adams and Jefferson, et al. for their foresight in making sure we have the means to defend ourselves.

    Regarding that idiot's suicide by ICE, I see where he has been declared a "Martyr" by Antifa. I would think their acknowledging and indicating their support for his violence would trigger their being declared a terrorist organization. What are the odds of that happening?

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    1. Good points Tom. Yes, antifa is a terrorist organization, the odds of that fact being acknowledged by the chattering class I would put at "slim to none."

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    2. Executive order would work. Then the police in Portland would have some backing to defy the Mayor. Assuming they are willing to do so, of course.

      Actions MUST have consequences. If those consequences are not administered by the agencies responsible, they will be administered by others. And that is the French Revolution in a nutshell.

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  11. Here's an interesting little video. A lot of parallels with recent events.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diEVmQZ1QfM

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    1. I've seen that before, might have been you that posted it, very interesting.

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    2. Likely so, and not just here. If I could, I would post it in every high school senior classroom in the country.

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  12. Re: Numbers and Stuff: Nice stuff!

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  13. By the way, congrats on the two mill. mark. My wife and I went on a short holiday, which is why I'm late commenting on the past several day's posts and comments.

    Paul

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Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)