Sunday, April 14, 2013

For All the NaCly Dogs


The Naviguesser's old ship, USS Nitze (DDG-94) and USS Mason (DDG-87).

Footage taken from USS Nitze's helo deck.


Racing at sea...

12 comments:

  1. Hey! When was this taken? SN2 might have been on board MASON, as he was her first CHENG (and a plank owner)... from 2003 to sometime in 2005.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. NITZE was commissioned in March of 2005. (I was there!) As this looks to be a Tiger cruise or Family Day Cruise (due to the civilians on board) this must have been taken after 2006.

      NITZE was my son's last assignment in the Navy and he left active duty in early 2006. There were no opportunities for family's to ride the ship prior to then (otherwise I would have been on board, guaranteed!) I'm betting this footage was taken on one of NITZE's many deployments since my son left the Navy.

      Pretty cool though that it was my son's old ship and your son's old ship steaming side by side!

      Delete
    2. NITZE was commissioned in March of 2005. (I was there!)

      I was at MASON's commissioning, too. That was one hellaciously fine weekend.

      Delete
    3. Sweet! (It's like we're in parallel universes!)

      Delete
    4. Don't go gettin' all metaphysical on me. ;-)

      Delete
    5. Uh, roger that. (What was I thinking?)

      Delete
  2. Reminds me of a story my CO told us. He was CHENG on an old FRAM destroyer heading out to sea for sea trials with a brand new cruiser back in the early 70's. The cruiser sent a flashing light message telling the destroyer to attempt to remain within visual signalling range while it conducted its full power trial. It promptly broke down. The destroyer sprinted for the horizon and then popped a signal that it was slowing down to remain within visual signaling distance.
    That was my navy!
    We spent a week steaming around the Strait of Juan de Fuca flying a rather clinical signal from the International Maritime Signal Book. Nobody said a thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is hysterical. I'm betting the cruiser skipper was fuming!

      Delete
    2. There us no such thing as a new FRAM destroyer... is there?
      I had the dubious pleasure of seeing a ship most of the way through a FRAM I and then sea trials and underway training.
      Those DDGs seemed to ride just a little better than the Gearing Class tin cans?

      Delete
    3. Sure Skip, there's no such thing as a new FRAM destroyer, but I'll betcha there's such a thing as a brand spankin' new FRAM LCS. (Can you guess I'm not a fan?)

      When you figure that a Gearing displaced 3,460 tons at full load and an Arleigh Burke displaces anywhere from 8,315 tons (Flight I) to round about 10,000 tons for the latest Flight IIIs, I'm guessing the ride would be a bit smoother.

      Also consider -
      Gearing-class: Length-390.5 ft, Beam-40.9 ft, Draft-14.3 ft
      Arleigh Burke-class: Length: 505-509 ft, Beam: 66 ft, Draft: 30.5 ft

      Delete
  3. Sarge, I know you love all your kids equally, despite the fact that the winged ones get more of the press here on Chez Sarge, but I don't think I'm alone when I say that this post made me think of the first picture under the sailor at this link: http://blogs.militarytimes.com/broadside/2011/03/21/bacons-25-favorite-broadsides/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bwaaaaa haaaaaa haaaaaaa!

      I love "Broadsides". I've actually been following his stuff for a while. And that first cartoon? The Nuke says it's EXACTLY LIKE THAT. She, being a SWO (Nuke) has dealt with aviation types on the bridge. She says it ain't pretty at times!

      Delete

Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)