Friday, December 20, 2013

The Friday Flyby - 20 December

(Alex Kew Photo)
Wikipedia - 
The Chance Vought F4U Corsair was an American fighter aircraft that saw service primarily in World War II and the Korean War. Demand for the aircraft soon overwhelmed Vought's manufacturing capability, resulting in production by Goodyear and Brewster: Goodyear-built Corsairs were designated FG and Brewster-built aircraft F3A. From the first prototype delivery to the U.S. Navy in 1940, to final delivery in 1953 to the French, 12,571 F4U Corsairs were manufactured by Vought, in 16 separate models, in the longest production run of any piston-engined fighter in U.S. history (1942–53).
Juvat mentioned this bird in the comments last week (which was all Spitfires!) and mentioned how the P-51, Spitfire and Corsair together would be pretty sweet. Well, throw in a P-40 and you have this -


And while there is no Corsair, the Cap'n (aka King of the North) desired a side of B-17 Flying Fortress to go with his Spitfire and Mustang...


I do "AIM" to please...

Oops! F-4G - Not F4U,
My Bad!

Right then, back to the Corsair! (In this next video, if you listen closely, you'll understand why the Corsair was nicknamed "The Whistling Death"!)


Wikipedia - 
The F4U incorporated the largest engine available at the time: the 2,000 hp (1,500 kW) 18-cylinder Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp radial. To extract as much power as possible a relatively large Hamilton Standard Hydromatic three-blade propeller of 13 feet 4 inches (4.06 m) was used. To accommodate a folding wing the designers considered retracting the main landing gear rearward but, for the chord of wing that was chosen, it was difficult to make the landing gear struts long enough to provide clearance for the large propeller. Their solution was an inverted gull wing, which considerably shortened the required length of the main gear legs. The anhedral of the wing's center-section also permitted the wing and fuselage to meet at the optimum angle for minimizing drag, without using wing root fairings. The bent wing, however, was heavier and more difficult to construct thus offsetting these benefits. 
Scramble

It's time for the rocket's red glare!

For the cutaway fans...

Speaking of cutaway views, I found this on the webs of world-wideness. Mr Park was an amazing modeler. Here's a sample of his work. RIP Mr Park.

The detail astonishes me!

Avec la Marine Française

Tailhook Legacy Flight, NAS Oceana
(Gladiators and Corsairs!)

Hook Down and Homeward Bound
USS ESSEX
(H/T to RL, USS ESSEX 1962 - 65)

Somewhere in the Pacific

First Kill for the Jolly Rogers
(Marc Stewart)

Corsairs Forever!

24 comments:

  1. I am such a HUGE fan of WWII aircraft - thank you!

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    1. Though I do jets from time to time (okay, a lot) you will see lots of WWII birds here. I love 'em too!

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  2. If I were a little more sentimental, I might have gotten just a little homesick for the "cans" in the pics with the carriers.
    Either of those two destroyers could easily be pre-FRAM versions of the one I sailed in.

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    1. It seems to me, though, that we always steamed in the wake of the carrier... and were always trying to catch up.

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    2. You tend to remember the good times.

      But if you think on it hard enough, the bad times pop up too!

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    3. My son and daughter were not big fans of playing plane guard.

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  3. So I'm sittin' here thinkin' about what to say and then it hits me: I don't think I ever saw a Corsair in flight. And then I had to think again, coz I DID see one at an air show down in Brownsville in 1999. So it's back to the UCR comment: Great post!

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    1. Thanks Buck.

      (I'm pretty sure I've never seen a Corsair in flight. I'll have to think on that but... no. Damn! I'll have to rectify that!)

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  4. Just beautiful. When I hit the lottery, I'm buying one that very day...and re-installing the machine guns.

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  5. OldAFSarge...you come to Thunder Over Michigan next year and you'll see one fly. There's always one there.

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    Replies
    1. Hhmm, gotta see how I can make that happen. That would be sweet.

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  6. What incredible aim! What a great post! I am a huge fan of WWII aircraft and even a few before and after that time.

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  7. Sorry for the lateness, actually read this on I-10 in Louisiana. Reading was easy, commenting would've required gyro stabilization on the iPad. VX might understand that. Anyhow. Loved this post. Many of my favorites with a gratuitous Phantom thrown in. So thanks. Another option for warbirds in flight is in Fredericksburg. The Hanger Hotel regularly schedules formation school where pilots can get formation currency to fly in air shows. Last one had several P-51s a couple of Corsairs, a TBM, Dauntless, B-17, and one of the last flying Wildcats. My property seems to be right under the practice area, so a lawn chair and a beer equals a heckuva air show.
    Well Merry Christmas to all and God Bless!

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    1. There is no "late" here. Ya comment when ya can.

      I'm just glad you didn't try commenting while on I-10 in Louisiana. That might have gotten interesting!

      Merry Christmas to you and yours as well Juvat. God Bless you all!

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  8. Heh, I was ALSO on the !-10 this weekend, "whom knows," juvat and I just might have inadvertently "joined up' in formation, lol.

    Mentioned before at both Buck's and at Lex, but the father (now unfortunately deceased) of one of my best friends in New Orleans flew both F6Fs and F4Us for the Navy in WW II. Had some great stories..

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    1. At some point in time Virgil, you should share those stories. Not just to entertain us, but (ya know) for posterity.

      (Hint, hint...)

      Two old Phantom guys on I-10. That would be a sight!

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  9. Replies
    1. Merry Christmas to you and yours as well!

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  10. OK, Here's two: I've told both these over at Lex's place and at least one at Buck's, but one never knows whose reading when, so I guss they're both worth re-telling. During my conversation with the old gentlemen the first time we met he related how much he enjoyed the flying in general and his Pacific Cmbt tour, I asked him "then if you enjoyed it so much why didn't you stay in the Navy at war's en? He replied: "Well, you see I made seven night carrier landings during the war and I came to the conclusion that if I wanted to live a long life, I'd better get out of the Navy." LOL!

    He mentioned he was originally from Kansas and I commented about the fact that so many land-locked mid-westerners seemed eager to join the Navy--especially during WW II when society was less mobile, etc. Even threw in N. Dakota's Joe Foss as an example. He laughed and said that when he was taking his flight physical in Santa Monica the Doc examining him casually asked the usual "where ya from, sailor?" and when he told him Kansas the Doc replied: "KANSAS! What is it with Kansas? Every third damn recruit coming thru the line is from Kansas!" LOLx2!

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    1. Great story Virgil. I think you did regale us with this over at Lex's. But it's worth repeating!

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Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)