Sunday, September 4, 2022

The Music Lives On

YouTube Screen Capture
Before I begin, let me just say that music, specifically rock music has been a part of my life since 1964. For it was then that these guys made their first trip to the U.S. of A. -

(Source)
Yeah, Dad was aghast at the music, the hair, the screaming females, but for me, it was a sea change. From that point forward nothing was ever quite the same.

In junior high (what is called "middle school" these days) we had music class, we were asked to submit what our preferences were for an instrument to learn how to play.

I chose drums.

I got the trumpet.

Seems that it wasn't really a music class wherein one could learn to play an instrument for the joy that was in it. No, it was a recruiting thing for the school band.

Mum and Dad wouldn't spring for a trumpet, I had to play a borrowed old cornet (similar to a trumpet). Which totally soured me on the whole band thing. (It was also the first time that I had felt betrayed by adults.)

Eventually I did get a cheap acoustic guitar (battered and beaten it's still around Chez Sarge, somewhere). I enjoyed playing it, some friends and I fooled around with starting a band. The guy whose idea it was wanted to play Monkees, all I wanted was Beatles. We amicably parted ways on that.

I did eventually get to play drums in a high school variety performance. There I was, up on stage with two guys (a bassist and a guitarist) who were both very, very good. All I had to do was keep a simple beat and, God forbid, sing.

We did it as a comedy thing, we pulled it off. But I didn't touch the drums again for many years.

Used to jam on the bass with some guys on Okinawa, great fun it was, but after one all day jam in the park on base, I tore my fingers to red ribbons. I wanted to wait a couple of days but the other guys were really pressuring me to join them, I just couldn't. It hurt to play.

I enjoy playing the guitar (six and four string) and of course really enjoy beating on my drums. When The Missus Herself is oot and aboot, she doesn't care for the noise. (Drums must played loud, I think it's a law or something.)

After LUSH got assigned to Oceana we went down to visit. On the way back from lunch, there was a song on the radio, this one -



Then, back at the town house which The Nuke and LUSH shared, that evening we watched Letterman. And guess who was on the show that night? Yup, Foo Fighters, playing Learn to Fly.

Okay, I didn't become a huge Foo Fighters fan that day, but that's where it started (must have been 2009 as I recall).

Over the years I heard their music, and really enjoyed it. But I was still a child of the 60s and early 70s. Jethro Tull, The Beatles, Led Zeppelin, Hendrix, et al, those were my go-to bands.

Then back in 2018 LUSH and I had the chance to go up to Boston (Fenway Park) and see the Foo Fighters in concert.

Oh my ...


It was a fantastic night, one of the best times I've ever had. (And I've had rather a lot, probably more than my fair share, but hey, I'm enjoying my life, if that's wrong I don't want to be right - that's a song, right?)

Bought every single Foo album there is, at least the ones I can find, I'm still looking for a lot of the covers they've done over the years, most of which can be found on the Tube o' You.

Anyhoo, then earlier this year, this happened.

Some Foo fans have had trouble listening to the music since Taylor's untimely death. Not me, more, I want more. So I listen and remember the good times.

(After all, I was a huge Beatles fan, they broke up, John died, George died, but I still listen to their music. They live on through their music.)

This Saturday instant there was a memorial concert at Wembley stadium, in London, started at 1130, finished at 1730. With one brief interruption to run an errand, I watched the whole thing.

A six-hour long celebration of a guy who played music well and loved doing it.  It was superb.

Left me thoughtful it did, seemed like a thing to post about for a Sunday in early September. So I did.

It's happening again in Los Angeles later this month, LUSH and I were sore-tempted to get tickets. But yeah, we're adults now, commitments and responsibilities. But it will be streamed, and I will watch.

Dave Grohl, Everlong, Wembley 2022
YouTube Screen Capture

Here's what it sounded like at the same venue, back in 2008, when Taylor yet lived.



It was the last song they played at Fenway, back in 2018.

Memories man, the music in my head and in my heart.

One wonders if it will ever be that good again ...

Peace.




 A Cautionary Note:
Yes, I know the Foo Fighters' politics differ from mine. Guess what? I don't care, not one wit. If you want to comment on politics or rant about whatever bee is in your bonnet, not today. Don't want any comments about drugs either, it's kind of an occupational hazard with musicians. Just enjoy the music.

As always, be nice.

46 comments:

  1. Due to my weird hearing loss and tinnitus (and the galaxy-smashing level of hate for people who go to concerts to listen to music but seem to think the concert is all about them whistling, singing off-key and out of synch, AND screaming so loud one cannot hear the band) I hate live venues for the most part. To the point that 'live' albums and 'live' songs, even professionally recorded, piss me off. Because if I plunk down $100 or more for a friggin ticket I want to actually, you know, hear the music and see the performers.

    Both times I've gone and seen Blue Man Group doing various versions of their Rockstar tour, and the Monkees' reunion tour, and Mannheim Steamroller Christmas show, the audience has been most graciously quiet so I can see and hear the music and performance. Yes, some laughs and stuff, but for the most part I go to a concert to be engrossed in the music on a better sound system than I can afford.

    Which is why I like classical concerts. Having sat through Beethoven's 7th, live, middle aisle, 10 rows back, wow.

    As to the Foo, I fell in love with their music watching their rather excellent music videos. Sense of humor abounded and abounds with those folk.

    It's sad when a talented performer (or anyone) does stupid stuff and ends up dying. Dammit. So much talent!

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    1. The few indoor concerts I've been to were like that. Never had that issue with outdoor venues. With the Foo it was all about the experience, Dave puts on one Hell of a show.

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  2. Older than you and the music is still a vital part of my life. Have never listened to the Foo Fighters as over the last years I have become hooked on the Symphonic Metal bands from Europe, with side trips into the dark folk and viking era bands. Plus whatever you call what Heilung does. But I am glad for you as nothing can bring joy like the right music.

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    1. I've dabbled in that genre, the Symphonic Metal bands are growing on me.

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  3. And just yesterday evening I was enjoying the Foo Fighters "Let It Die". Had the stereo in the car cranked to 11...
    ;-)
    Barry

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  4. Of an age, certainly; but I started on rock well before the Beatles arrived. Surf guitar anyone? Lots of good American rock pre-64. Got into British blues then three-guitar Southern rock. Been following Mark Knopfler since Dire Straits, finally saw him live at Red Rocks.
    While I love good guitar, I really like nearly all music; except operas and I still like some of that music on it's own; especially Bizets "Carmen".
    I understand and can empathize with Beans on some popular live performamces; I go to hear the musicians, not the morons around me.
    Boat Guy

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    1. Love Knopfler, great guitarist. Not sure why I didn't start until the Ed Sullivan thing happened. Probably because everyone watched that back in the day, Dad didn't want to, Mom gave nim no choice. So we were hooked. Did listen to the surf stuff later on, but it never really took with me.

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    2. The summer of 1964 (as I recall), it was The Beach Boys and The Beatles.

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  5. I second James' take on Symphonic Metal/Dark Folk and Heilung. Those are groups that can still play real instruments, don't need Auto Tune to sing, and do all of that well enough for live shows. And the songs are not written by committee - or AI - like American "Pop" music, but are written by people who (generally) have something to say.

    Beans, I think you might be pleasantly surprised by some of the live recordings that have come out in the past 10 years or so. They have done something new to reduce the insanity from the crowds, and make the music come through. And even before the start of COVID they started making "live in studio" recordings that are sort of amazing. If you like jazz check out Snarky Puppy's *We Like It Here* DVD (as Sarge says on Tube O' You)

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    1. Most modern music is rather abysmal, too much computer and special effects being "blended" in.

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  6. Sarge! Something we share! I, too, started out as a trumpet player in middle school (graduating in turn to tuba, baritone, trombone - although I play none of them now - and harp, which I still do play occasionally). I do think the one thing that band does is give one the ability to appreciate and understand music a bit, even if we do not start out playing the instruments we desire.

    My age group of music (about twenty years behind yours) is not make their nostalgia/farewell/final/final-final tours now. The Ravishing Mrs. TB goes to a great many of them - like Beans, I am not a lover or crowds or loudness, and so generally stay home. She says they are overall pretty enjoyable, although sometimes the age really shows through.

    That said, the InterWeb makes it pretty easy to find songs I remember and like instead of having to fish around for new music. When we were driving back from our Whitney Hike, the Spotify playlist was the '80's. I l think I could listen to rock and new wave from the 1970's to mid 1980's and be happy as a clam.

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    1. For certain bands I'll tolerate the crowds. I will say one thing though, Foo crowds are somehow different than other concert crowds I've experienced. The folks at a Foo concert know the songs, know the lyrics, and absolutely love that band. Somehow it's all rather different and enjoyable.

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  7. Regarding your cautionary note, which I agree with, but I prefer when my artists are apolitical. I don't want to care a whit about what they think, and wish they'd just use their public forums to entertain me, vice criticize, shame, or attempt to teach me. I can't say I'm truly able to not care a whit, especially when they blather on about what they believe, but I try, especially because I believe that's part of what we need- different people with different opinions, all getting along in spite of political differences. That might even eventually lead to respect and compromise. Anything else just extends the division we have in this country.

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    1. By the way, as of yesterday, I've joined you in electronic drum ownership

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    2. Tuna #1 - The Foos don't blather on about politics when they're playing music. In interviews sure, but usually because they get asked.

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    3. Tuna #2 - Awesome! What did you get? Do you like it? How does it sound and feel?

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    4. Yeah, it's when those celebs force it on us, like at awards shows, or attempt to belittle us with their holier than thou attitudes. FF doesn't do that. The set is a fairly simple budget one- Asmuse AD-20 https://www.amazon.com/Asmuse-Electronic-Beginners-Supported-Headphone/dp/B08DFBSQRY

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    5. Still setting it up. I'll let you know.

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    6. Tuna the 1st - Believe what you will, do what you want, just don't try selling it to me. The Foos are good for not doing that.

      Nice kit! (Nice price!)

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    7. Tuna the 2nd - We expect a full(ish) report. 😎

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  8. I had an off ramp experience too. Grew up listening to classical, movie themes, (How the West Was Won and Magnificent Seven still give me chills), Sons of the Pioneers, and country. My sister was a Beatles nut, Cowseals, Chicago.... but the first time I remember really tuning into rock was about 15, then it was catch up for lost time. Really liked Styx's Renegade... still do. Dad used to rag on me about listening to that stuff, but I never quit listening to what I grew up with. Besides, his favorite hymn was Peace in the Garden, and that was written by a night club pianist that was black. Down in the south, that was enough for churches to ban it. And he loved it. So whatever rebellious streak I have I inherited, I reckon.

    Some EDM is pretty fun to hear, and there is this thing on YT, Stone Rebel that I use as background music some days. There is so much variety now, something for every one, and just two clicks away.

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    1. I do like some Styx, I remember when they first came out.

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  9. "Just enjoy the music." Well said!

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  10. We seem to like the same types of music, Sarge. My first album was CCR's Cosmos Factory. Mom said I could spend some of my lawn mowing money on "Whatever" I wanted. So I did. She gulped a couple of times when I showed her, but she stood by her word. Dad, on the other hand...Well, let's just say, it wasn't until I got my first ride in the Eagle and did the vertical climbout thing, that I ever saw anyone go into orbit that fast. We came to an agreement, I wouldn't play my albums (there grew to be quite a few) if he was home. Which was ok by me, Homework, Dinner and TV were the play of the day.
    I also loved 1812 Overture was the first record I remember listening to, got me hooked on classical music . I'm also fond of country and western, jazz and blues, and most other genre's. Can't stand Rap, though. Doesn't sound like music to me.

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    1. Our tastes do coincide in a number of areas.

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    2. 1812's OK but if you really want Tschaikovsky (sp?) It's the Violin Concerto for me; brilliant!
      BG

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    3. I just tracked that down and gave it a listen. Beautiful piece of music.

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  11. Weird Al Yankovich's "Amish Paradise" is one of the best rap songs ever. The video is great, too.

    Loved listening to Dad's copy of the 1812 Overture. It was the recording where they used an actual Napoleonic-era gun from one of the US Service Academies to get the gun noise.

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    1. That was the version I was referring to, Beans. Love it!

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    2. 1822 Overture, cannon fire,what's not to love?

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  12. Stood in the rain during Homecomming at Mississippi State U. to listen to Weird Al and his accordion. He was a trip. Aerobracero.

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  13. Crusty Old TV Tech here. Played French Horn in the concert band, and F Trumpet in marching band. Our band director was a fan of the more off the beaten path, though we did play Sleigh Ride every Christmas concert. Still remember the 2nd Horn part for that one after all these decades, sadly. We, however, to compensate, got to play Holst's The Planets: Mars, Bringer of War, and Moussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition: Promenade, Bydlo, The Hut of the Baba Yaga and The Great Gate of Kiev in concert. Still love all of them. Also, Mozart's Horn Concertos, especially the Dennis Brain recordings. Too bad you didn't get to play those Sarge!

    Rock, however...Blue Öyster Cult first and foremost, Buck Dharma's guitar playing is unreal, Kiss, Devo, Rush, Alice Cooper, The Specials, Madness, Head East (got to hear them at college!), Skynyrd, ZZ Top, The Goodrats...then one of the harmonics introduced Flogging Molly and Celtic Punk. Ah, that's the ticket! And now, The Dreadnoughts is one of my favorites, especially their "Into The North" album.

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    1. I wore the grooves off my copy of Agents of Fortune, Blue Öyster Cult was awesome. Rush and ZZ Top were (are?) favorites as well!

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    2. Crusty Old TV Tech again. With the money I earned the first few weeks at the TV shop, I went to Stan's Record Shop and bought Agents of Fortune. Still have that vinyl, though as you said, the sound quality has degraded from plenty much use. Next after that was my own (not the 8-Track dupe, which I had played until it jammed) vinyl copy of 2112, and Tres Hombres (haw haw haw haw!). Aforementioned TV shop had some good Zenith stereo equipment on the showroom floor, which I got to use to dupe 8-Tracks from vinyl for myself and friends. Cassettes had just become good enough to displace 8-Tracks then, so later on it was cassette dupes. And, I had a reel-to-reel 1/2" machine put together from scrapped decks, so I duped those for myself. Ah, good days.

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    3. I remember those days, things seemed, I dunno, shiny back then.

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  14. Love reading the comments!
    I remember listening to Alan Freed on WINS radio back in the '50s (it only seems like a long time ago) and going with my cousins to the Brooklyn Paramount in September 1955; I don't remember if it was Friday the 9th or Saturday the 10th and hearing (and watching) Chuck Berry onstage for the first time.

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    1. Chuck Berry?!?! (I'll try not to be jealous ...)

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  15. Played the piano until junior high, then the Sousaphone and tuba through high school. Took up small instruments -- harmonica, tin whistle, uke, bongos -- for a while. Still have the smalls, and an 88-key e-piano. Sadly, I don't play much of anything now. The uninsured mikes, mixers, quarter-inch tape gear, all stolen. :(

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  16. Just watched My Hero with Taylor's son on drums. He's as good as his dad.

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Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)
Can't be nice, go somewhere else...

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