Friday, October 7, 2016

Gone Fishing?

Alexander Nevsky (Александр Невский) in Vilyuchinsk (Вилючинск). (Source)
So my colleague at work asked me if I had heard of the Russian submarine surfacing near the two Russian fishermen out for a day's fishing in their wee inflatable.

"Why no, no, I had not heard of that."

My Google-fu being very strong on Thursday, I had located the video on the Tube o' You within minutes. I had also tracked down the class of Russian submarine depicted in the video. No, I don't know the names of the two Russian fishermen. Yet. We're working on it...

Anyhoo. Here's the video.



Here's where I found the initial story.

I'm pretty sure my hands would have been shaking too. I would also probably need a change of undies as well.

"Now let's go get wasted."

Um, yeah. I'd do the same...

The boat is the newest Russian boomer, a Borei (Борей) class, of which there are only three underway at the moment. They are big boats, 550+ feet long and displacing 14,000+ tons on the surface and 24,000 odd tons submerged. Yes, I looked it up, Borei is the Russian word for the Greek god of the North Wind, Boreas.

Wherever that footage was taken, it looks cold. Could be a Northern Fleet boat in the Kola Fjord, in which case that's the Yury Dolgorukiy (K-535). I suppose it could be one of the boats in the Pacific Fleet out of Vladivostok. Both places aren't what you'd call "tropical."

In America, you can always find fish...

In Russia, fish find you.



Just to be clear who I borrowed that line from...



38 comments:

  1. Egads, neat, but would not like to get snagged on that! Or noodeling? Say, just back from seeing the silverside. Now, that was cool. Didn't stay overnight though.

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    1. Nor would I!

      That's a pretty neat museum, I like the location too.

      Delete
  2. Nothing like taking a look around with the periscope before surfacing. Igor, surface the boat.

    But Capitain . . We must look.

    Surface the boat Igor. I need a smoke.

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    1. "A single ping Vasily, just give me a single ping." Sayeth Captain First Rank Marko Ramius (as played by Sean Connery in The Hunt for Red October).

      Russian, need a smoke, it all computes.

      :)

      Delete
  3. 1988-"In America, you can always find a party. In Russia, Party always finds you."
    2016-"In Russia, you can always find a party. In America, Party always find you."

    Whoda Thunk?

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  4. "...aren't what you'd call 'tropical.'"

    I can vouch for the vicinity of Vladivostok.
    Took a little cruise up there in the summer of '63 and saw some flying bears (IYKWIM).

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  5. I am somewhat amazed at the ubiquity of cell phones. "They're everywhere! They're everywhere!"

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  6. Ooh-ooh, just remembered why that name rang a bell, Prokofiev's "Alexander Nevsky" played a critical part in Clancy's "Red Storm Rising," which I read on deployment in Nimitz when it first came out. We actually had a workup scenario where we took a couple of Kingfish back in the wires on the roof, and we spent a lot of time working with Foch in the Med. It was just a tad bit eerie to be reading that book and look up and around and actually be there.

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    1. Yes, Alexander Nevsky defeated the Teutonic knights once upon a time.

      Big hero in Mother Russia!

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    2. Nice tune. Though I prefer this one.

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    3. That's a cool scene. Being the nit-picker I am I'm often disappointed with the "movie version," but that one was done pretty well. Amazing how James Bond can morph into a believable Marko Ramius. Wonder how the control room of the Акула compares to the movie version?

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    4. I've heard that Russian boats are even more claustrophobic than the U.S. variety. Just realized that what the Russians call an Akula, we call a Typhoon. And what they call the Щука (Shchuka or "pike"), we call an Akula.

      Odd that NATO actually used a Russian word for a Soviet submarine class. Of course, "both" Akulas were used in the movie. (Seems to me I recall an attack boat called an "Alfa" by NATO which looked a lot like a Pike, or Shark/Akula. A very fast, titanium-hulled boat.)

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    5. That is interesting. Soviet submarines are endlessly fascinating.

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    6. The Russians have some interesting gear, that's for sure.

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  7. Looks like the offspring of a DELTA and an OSCAR.

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    1. Whatever it's the progeny of, he's a big boy. (Russians, as I recall, refer to their ships/boats as "he.")

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  8. The torpedo tubes are mounted awfully high in the hull.

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    1. He has six torpedo tubes, all forward in the bow. Those bulges are to accommodate the 16 (955) to 20 (955A) ballistic missiles. He's a boomer.

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    2. I am looking at the bow, the torpedo tube outer doors are the doors in an arc across the top. I see 4 more doors across the horizontal centerline. The OSCARs used to have 6 tubes, four self defense 533mm tubes, and two 650mm anti CVN/ULCC tubes, should the opportunity occur. I am wondering if they are arming these subs for bear, as it were.

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    3. The doors for the torpedo tubes are round and just above the water line. Is that what you're looking at? Those semi-rectangular things are too high in the hull to be tubes. That would put the tube outside of the pressure hull wouldn't it?

      According to the sources I've looked at, the Borei-class has six tubes, which can launch torpedoes or cruise missiles.

      Of course, I've also seen drawings which indicate these boats have eight torpedo tubes.

      Delete
  9. <Fisherman looks at filleting knife>

    [Russian] I'm going to need a longer blade.

    Oh, and FYI, I'm not ignoring your (plural) serious posts, nor am I uninterested in sharing my opinions; I simply don't care to do so publicly.

    Bruce Jones

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    1. Hahaha! In Russian that would be "Я буду нуждаться в более длинный клинок." (YA budu nuzhdat'sya v boleye dlinnyy klinok.)

      As to the more serious posts, copy that Bruce.

      I try not to stay serious for too long.

      I mean we get enough of that in real life.

      Delete
  10. I had a friend who had a video of a sub popping up near his small sailboat. I think it was in SF Bay...is that possible? Anyway it was somewhere and it gave him a start.

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    1. It would be unusual for a sub to be submerged in San Francisco Bay. According to one thing I found -

      The central portion of the San Francisco Bay has an average depth of 43 feet. The northern and southern area has an average depth of 15 to 17 feet. The Bay's deepest point is 360 feet and is located under the Golden Gate Bridge.

      Submarines usually transit from their bases on the surface and only submerge when they've got plenty of water under the keel. I'd bet it could have been in Washington state, there is a submarine base, Naval Base Kitsap-Bangor, where we have subs. Again though, it seems odd for them to submerge that close ashore.

      Unless it was a Russian sub?

      Delete
  11. Video did not show the sub surfacing, just going by on the surface.

    Sorta off topic.
    Way back when.
    I was part of the crew on a tug on Guam. When we were scheduled to meet a sub coming into port one of the things we would do is look for the Russian trawler, if it was there then we knew the sub was on schedule, if we could not see the trawler then more often than not the sub was not coming in.
    This was when John Walker was doing business with the Soviets.

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    1. The surfacing bit was the back story. I wish the video had shown the sub surfacing.

      John Walker, that traitor can rot. Did business with the Soviets for a few grand. What an a-hole.

      Good stories are never off topic Jon. :)

      Delete

Just be polite... that's all I ask. (For Buck)